marcys-mareep:

adventure time literally explaining colonialism in 30 seconds

imbobswaget:

things ppl say that alerts you to them being the actual worst:

  • john was my favourite beatle 
  • abolishing religion would solve a lot of problems 
  • i’m not a racist i hate all races equally 
  • disliking someone because of their political affiliation is ridiculous 
  • but if you think about it stereotypes do exist for a reason 
  • god, can you believe people on welfare own iphones
  • but what about mens rights
  • why can’t white people say the n-word
  • i’m just being the devils advocate
My uncle is a cop and he is really nice.

(Source: blackfashion)

ha! yeah if she has other beautifully healed tattoos then the variable there miiiiight be the artist’s technique

ha! yeah if she has other beautifully healed tattoos then the variable there miiiiight be the artist’s technique

Personal Experience and Other Things

pfdiva: we-speak-body-language:

While we’ve already posted about mirroring, I’ve noticed something else that isn’t mentioned in any kinesics books I’ve read. Some people in particular are very susceptible to others’ body language, to the point of copying not only friends but…

the way groups of people start using the same cadence of speech and particular vocabulary or unique connotations

(eg it’s understood among my friends that if someone says “she’s a very nice girl” what’s meant is “she doesn’t do anything outright terrible up front but I don’t like her”; Q, Abby, and I say “snailed it!” when something is done perfectly OR totally botched; penguin emoji 🐧 is an expression of affection for q&I)

is called an ecolect!

(Source: wespeakbodylanguage)

fwiw, in my experience spottiness is as likely to come from the aftercare/healing process as from the artist themself:) I’ve had spotting/fading that was definitely from me scratching at my scabs in my sleep or dicking around with the skin during the peeling stage

the trick is to decide if it was the artist or if your friend didn’t take aftercare seriously enough which… isn’t easy. the worst part is that artists usually only have a handful of pictures of healed tattoos bc it’s rare for someone to actually come back in for them to snap a pic once it’s healed, and “how it looks once it’s finished healing” is obviously an essential part of “having a tattoo your whole life”

fwiw, in my experience spottiness is as likely to come from the aftercare/healing process as from the artist themself:) I’ve had spotting/fading that was definitely from me scratching at my scabs in my sleep or dicking around with the skin during the peeling stage

the trick is to decide if it was the artist or if your friend didn’t take aftercare seriously enough which… isn’t easy. the worst part is that artists usually only have a handful of pictures of healed tattoos bc it’s rare for someone to actually come back in for them to snap a pic once it’s healed, and “how it looks once it’s finished healing” is obviously an essential part of “having a tattoo your whole life”

do itttttttttt

do itttttttttt

it cannot be said enough: choose your artist based on their portfolio

if they don’t have one, walk away

look to see the quality, how much is flash and how much is photos of actual tattoos, what their experience is in the style you want. an artist who does flawless linework and blackwork might not do great color shading, someone who has incredible script lettering might be terrible with geometric art, etc — just like every human being, tattoo artists have strengths and weaknesses

someone working at a shop with a great reputation might be new and have a shitty attitude or do shaky linework or tattoo too deeply or shallow for good healing on your skin. someone at a shop where half the artists seem like jerks, might be the one good ass person who puts up with the others bc management is great. that flawless artist you worked with last time might have left that shop and been replaced with someone shoddy as fuck

choose an artist, not a shop

real talk: going in to a shop with a design planned out and looking for whichever artist is free that day is a 100% different experience than building a collaborative relationship with a specific artist. some shops (chain shops come to mind) are more oriented toward one-offs, other shops are run in a way that encourages relationships, return customer loyalty, and word of mouth

I say this as someone who has 4 tattoos which I love that were 100% planned before I stepped into the shop

but guess which kind of work tends to be higher quality?