isharrystylesreal:

kid cudi is my favorite

(Source: niallzkilam)

kelsium:

The thing about that bullshit is that I don’t entirely disagree that men’s friendships and group dynamics, especially healthy portrayals thereof, are kind of absent from the standard Western canon, but I wouldn’t call that “a dearth of novels that explore male issues.” I would call that “take it up with the patriarchy, maybe find some new fucking ways to express your masculinity other than alienation and punching people.”

Anonymous said: how do i get my girlfriend to shave her pussy?

iratheunicorn:

Here’s what you do… Go to your girlfriend’s place and apologize for tricking her into thinking you were an adult who could handle something as simple has pubic hair and then tell her she should leave you because you’re a jackass.

Moses vs. the monsters. Kill ‘em. Kill all them things.

(Source: monkeyknifefight)

For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”

kelsium:

Team give up and lie on the ocean floor and let the fish clean your bones and hope some interesting coral formation decides to make you its home.

cptfunk said: "#ok but what about the fact that he's a cannibal" = incapacitated me. laughter for days.

axmxz:

erikawithac:

I just kept waiting for it to come into play and it never did ok the man is hannibal the cannibal tell me what kind of impact his soviet orphan childhood would have had on him becoming a serial murdering cannibal

[snip]

He probably does what many affluent people do: goes to a higher end grocery store, selects the produce himself, but then has it delivered to his house. He’d never relinquish control of his kitchen to a personal shopper, after all, and he’s his own personal chef. Ordering from catalogs is risky, because you can’t see/smell/touch the produce yourself…

Again, the issue of time management comes up. Hannibal has not one but basically two jobs, to say nothing of his ‘extracurriculars’. When does he find the time to shop for *that* many different ingredients *that* frequently? Presumably he’d need to hit not just a general grocery store but also a number of specialized importers. Last I checked, Whole Foods doesn’t stock either escargot or ortolans.

With respect to leftovers… I dunno, makes another meal out of then, then throws the rest out? It’s kind of sad, really. He probably tries to eat as much as he can, which is why the only time we see him in the gym, he’s swimming: a good way to burn off maximum calories without bulking up.

I guess he’s one of those superhuman genius types who get just a few hours of sleep a night? plenty of time for work, errands, and extracurriculars that way.

I assume things like the lung scramble are where last night’s dinner goes, but now I’m just picturing him making leftover people casserole. I wonder what Hannibal thinks about waste. does it reinforce his feelings of affluence, control, and security? it’s hard for me to imagine someone so refined feeling good about tossing away large amounts of wasted food, and it’s hard for me to imagine Hannibal not feeling good about anything he does.

this is probably my inner oregonian speaking here, since the majority of affluent people here - even those who enjoy excess and impractical luxury - look at wastefulness and being environmentally “unfriendly” as distasteful, a mark of being low-class and ignorant. hannibal’s sensibilities probably differ a lot from that perspective.

disinfest:


This month’s WIRED cover features 12-year-old Paloma Noyola Bueno, currently the top ranking student in México. This cover story filled me with joy and not because it’s focused on poverty in borderlands and autodidactism (although that’s definitely a plus), but because it’s heartening to know that there is people like Sergio Juárez Correa creating contrast in education in Mexico, especially poverty-stricken areas that don’t have a lot of resources. Juárez Correa, tired of ineffective teaching methods and fruitless results, he began to research new teaching methods and came across Sugata Mitra’s methods on self-directed learning. Mitra is best known for his experiments in India where he left computers for children to use and “without any instruction, they were able to teach themselves a surprising variety of things, from DNA replication to English.”
With the first trial of self-directed learning lessons, Juárez Correa, not only was able to bring down the national standardized exam fail rates (from 45 percent in math to 7 percent and 31 percent in Spanish to 3.5 percent), but he was able to bring his students to the top of the math and Spanish rankings in Mexico. He also didn’t just lead self-directed learning in math and Spanish, but in other topics including controversial topics.
Juárez Correa began hosting regular debates in class, and he didn’t shy away from controversial topics. He asked the kids if they thought homosexuality and abortion should be permitted. He asked them to figure out what the Mexican government should do, if anything, about immigration to the US. Once he asked a question, he would stand back and let them engage one another.
The article has great studies that have been done on self-directed learning. You can read the article here.
“The bottom line is, if you’re not the one controlling your learning, you’re not going to learn as well.”

disinfest:

This month’s WIRED cover features 12-year-old Paloma Noyola Bueno, currently the top ranking student in México. This cover story filled me with joy and not because it’s focused on poverty in borderlands and autodidactism (although that’s definitely a plus), but because it’s heartening to know that there is people like Sergio Juárez Correa creating contrast in education in Mexico, especially poverty-stricken areas that don’t have a lot of resources. Juárez Correa, tired of ineffective teaching methods and fruitless results, he began to research new teaching methods and came across Sugata Mitra’s methods on self-directed learning. Mitra is best known for his experiments in India where he left computers for children to use and “without any instruction, they were able to teach themselves a surprising variety of things, from DNA replication to English.”

With the first trial of self-directed learning lessons, Juárez Correa, not only was able to bring down the national standardized exam fail rates (from 45 percent in math to 7 percent and 31 percent in Spanish to 3.5 percent), but he was able to bring his students to the top of the math and Spanish rankings in Mexico. He also didn’t just lead self-directed learning in math and Spanish, but in other topics including controversial topics.

Juárez Correa began hosting regular debates in class, and he didn’t shy away from controversial topics. He asked the kids if they thought homosexuality and abortion should be permitted. He asked them to figure out what the Mexican government should do, if anything, about immigration to the US. Once he asked a question, he would stand back and let them engage one another.

The article has great studies that have been done on self-directed learning. You can read the article here.

“The bottom line is, if you’re not the one controlling your learning, you’re not going to learn as well.”

(Source: xicanacoder)

cptfunk said: "#ok but what about the fact that he's a cannibal" = incapacitated me. laughter for days.

axmxz:

eaten-by-bears0rz:

erikawithac:

I just kept waiting for it to come into play and it never did ok the man is hannibal the cannibal tell me what kind of impact his soviet orphan childhood would have had on him becoming a serial murdering cannibal

[snop]

I assume this Hanners was still force-fed part of his sister, whatever the perpetrator’s motivation, which in other canons is his first taste of human. I think part of the reason he eats his victims is so he can re-tell that story to himself and change the ending. It’s a reassurance that he’s in control now, he’s the predator, he decides who dies, and if there’s anything heartbreaking in the food, he knows because he’s the one that cooked it.

That would also fit with just harvesting small pieces instead of butchering whole bodies. He can do that now, because he has enough food that this isn’t a necessity. It’s a sign that he’s hunting for pleasure instead of because he’s forced to.

ETA: Aww, I just realized it’s his own version of what he prescribed for Abby-chan. Instead of dosing up on psilocybin and having a happy version of breakfast for dinner (her parents’ last meal), he goes out and makes a happy version of human meat (his sister’s last… anything, really).

That sounds like a very plausible theory: rewriting the cannibalism narrative to derive strength from it rather than dwelling on the trauma.

Also, isn’t it interesting how much his consumption of human meat contrasts with his purchasing of other groceries? With human meat, he gets *exactly* the amount he needs for a specific purpose. One kidney, just enough bowel for just enough sausages; everything is very precise, everything portioned just right in accordance to the number of guests he’s feeding.

Whereas with all other food, it’s the opposite; it looks like he goes to the store, piles a cart to the ceiling with EVERYTHING, then once the home delivery service arrives with like 20 bags, he probably sorts it all and shakes his head at himself as he clears rotten fruit and veg from the fridge to make room for new fruit and veg.

ok now all I want in the world is a sequence of Hannibal grocery shopping for his regular food. what do you think Hannibal considers appropriate grocery-shopping wear? what would a grocery store fancy enough for Hannibal to set foot in it be like? what DOES he do with his leftovers, besides trick Will into eating lung sausage scramble? does Hannibal feel disappointment in himself? he’s so calculated and controlled, and thinks so highly of himself, what’s it like when he realizes he’s got half a roast pig left over from a tiny dinner with friends?

burningtulle:

burningtulle:

my random aesthetichell dryad lesbian babe

also classic siren teen mermaid

gosh wow, every single dream come true

bloody loser nightmare chic

yeah that sums it up